Mastering React Server-Side Rendering with Next.js & TypeScript

Siam Ahnaf
3 min readSep 30, 2023

React has revolutionized the way we build user interfaces, offering a declarative and efficient approach to designing interactive applications. However, as applications grow in complexity, optimizing for performance becomes crucial. One powerful technique for achieving this is Server-Side Rendering (SSR), and when combined with Next.js and TypeScript, it unlocks a new level of scalability, maintainability, and developer experience.

Understanding the Power of Server-Side Rendering

Server-Side Rendering involves rendering your React components on the server side before sending them to the client. This approach brings several benefits, such as improved performance, search engine optimization (SEO), and better user experience, especially on slower networks.

Next.js, a popular React framework, simplifies the implementation of SSR. It seamlessly integrates with React, providing a streamlined development experience and abstracting away many of the complexities involved in setting up SSR manually.

Setting Up Your Next.js Project with TypeScript

To embark on the journey of mastering React SSR with Next.js, the first step is to set up your project. Utilizing TypeScript adds static typing to your code, catching potential errors early and enhancing the overall development experience.

Start by creating a new Next.js project with TypeScript:

npx create-next-app my-ssr-app --use-npm --example with-typescript
cd my-ssr-app
npm run dev

This creates a basic Next.js project with TypeScript support. You can now build upon this foundation to implement SSR.

Building Server-Side Rendered Pages

Next.js simplifies the process of creating SSR pages. Instead of defining a traditional React component, you’ll use the getServerSideProps function inside your pages. This function runs on the server side and fetches the required data, which is then passed to the page component as props.

Here’s a simple example:

// pages/index.tsx

import { GetServerSideProps } from 'next';

const Home: React.FC<{ data: string }> = ({ data }) => {
return (
<div>
<h1>{data}</h1>
</div>
);
};

export const getServerSideProps: GetServerSideProps = async () => {
// Fetch data from an API or database
const data = 'Hello from the server side!';

return {
props: {
data,
},
};
};

export default Home;

In this example, the getServerSideProps function fetches data on the server side and passes it as props to the Home component. This data is then rendered on the client side.

Leveraging TypeScript for Type Safety

As your project grows, maintaining code quality becomes crucial. TypeScript comes to the rescue by providing static typing, enabling you to catch potential issues during development rather than at runtime.

Utilize TypeScript interfaces to define the shape of your data and props:

// types/index.ts

interface HomeProps {
data: string;
}

export { HomeProps };

Then, use this interface in your component:

// pages/index.tsx

import { GetServerSideProps } from 'next';
import { HomeProps } from '../types';

const Home: React.FC<HomeProps> = ({ data }) => {
return (
<div>
<h1>{data}</h1>
</div>
);
};

export const getServerSideProps: GetServerSideProps<HomeProps> = async () => {
// Fetch data from an API or database
const data = 'Hello from the server side!';

return {
props: {
data,
},
};
};

export default Home;

By incorporating TypeScript, you ensure that your code remains robust and maintainable as your project evolves.

Optimizing Performance with Code Splitting

To further enhance performance, leverage Next.js’s built-in support for code splitting. This technique allows you to load only the necessary JavaScript for a particular page, reducing the initial page load time.

Simply break your application into smaller, more manageable modules, and let Next.js handle the rest. This is especially beneficial for large-scale applications with numerous components.

// pages/about.tsx

import dynamic from 'next/dynamic';

const DynamicComponent = dynamic(() => import('../components/DynamicComponent'));

const About: React.FC = () => {
return (
<div>
<h1>About Page</h1>
<DynamicComponent />
</div>
);
};

export default About;

By dynamically importing components, you ensure that they are loaded only when required, optimizing the overall performance of your SSR application.

Conclusion

Mastering React Server-Side Rendering with Next.js and TypeScript empowers you to build high-performance, scalable applications with confidence. By harnessing the power of SSR, TypeScript’s static typing, and Next.js’s streamlined development experience, you can create web applications that not only meet but exceed user expectations.

Embrace the principles outlined in this guide, experiment with your project, and unlock the full potential of SSR for your React applications. Happy coding!

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Siam Ahnaf

I'm Siam Ahnaf, a passionate developer who loves to learn new things and create awesome projects. I enjoy working on both front-end and back-end development.